How To Conquer Handwashing That Will Help You With Caregiving

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10 months ago

Handwashing

Handwashing is the number one way to prevent infections and the spread of illnesses. So, wash your hands! I can not say this enough. The number one cause of the reach of bacteria and other germs is a lack of frequent and proper handwashing. How long should I wash my hands? A good exercise in determining the appropriate time element is to sing a verse of the song “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star.” or say your ABCs. In healthcare, workers are trained to wash their hands before and after assisting each patient. It is said that a busy CNA or nurse’s hands and fingertips should look pruned like they just got out of the pool or washed the dishes. Excellent and frequent handwashing promotes infection control.

The spread of germs and bacteria is inevitable. You can’t avoid it, but following these simple rules and making these changes can make a considerable impact on your and your family’s health and enable you to help reduce the spread of germs and bacteria.

When is handwashing done?

We touch our loved ones, surfaces, food, and other objects throughout the day, so handwashing should be done frequently. Here are a few examples of when handwashing should be done. Dealing with germs day out and being careful not to irritate the condition any further can cause strain on you as the family caregiver. Check out my ebook on compassionate care 101 or other resources to help.

Always wash your hands before

Handling food or eating after using the bathroom, blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing, caring for someone sick, touching animals, animal feed, or animal waste, and handling garbage. It’s also a good idea to wash your hands after being in a public place or touching frequently touched surfaces such as doorknobs, elevator buttons, and handrails. By washing your hands often, you can help prevent the spread of germs and keep yourself and others healthy.

Always wash your hands after:

You are handling raw meat, poultry, or fish, after changing a diaper or cleaning up a child who has used the toilet, caring for someone who is sick or treating a wound, touching a pet or animal, handling garbage, and blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing. Additionally, washing your hands after coming into contact with someone with a contagious illness or if you have been in a crowded public place where you may have been exposed to germs is essential. Washing your hands after these activities can help prevent the spread of germs and keep you and others healthy.

How to wash your hands

 

Proper handwashing is crucial for caregivers to prevent the spread of infection to vulnerable individuals they care for. Here are some tips to help you conquer handwashing:

Use warm water: Warm water is more effective in removing dirt and germs from your hands.
Use soap: Use mild soap that is gentle on your skin but strong enough to kill germs.
Rub your hands together: For at least 20 seconds, lather all areas, including between your fingers and under your nails.
Rinse your hands thoroughly with running water to remove all soap and dirt.
Dry your hands: Dry your hands using a clean towel or air dry them.
Use hand sanitizer: Use hand sanitizer when you cannot access soap and water. Make sure to use one that contains at least 60% alcohol and rub it into your hands for at least 20 seconds.
Wash your hands frequently: Make sure to wash your hands frequently, especially before and after caring for someone, preparing food, using the bathroom, or touching anything contaminated.

By following these tips, you can help prevent the spread of infection and protect yourself and those you care for.

How to minimize the spread of germs and infection as a caregiver

 

Cleanliness is next to Godliness. As a caregiver, there are several steps you can take to reduce the spread of germs and disease:

Practice good hand hygiene: Wash your hands frequently with soap and warm water for at least 20 seconds, or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer when soap and water are unavailable. Make sure to wash your hands before and after caring for someone, after using the bathroom, before and after handling food, and after coughing, sneezing, or blowing your nose.
Wear personal protective equipment (PPE): Use gloves, masks, and gowns when necessary, especially when providing care to someone who is sick or has an infectious disease.
Keep the environment clean: Regularly clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces such as doorknobs, countertops, and light switches. Use an effective disinfectant against the specific virus or bacteria you are trying to eliminate.
Use proper food handling techniques: Properly cook and store food, and avoid cross-contamination using separate cutting boards and utensils for raw meat and other foods.
Avoid close contact: Stay at least 6 feet away from anyone sick or showing symptoms of an infectious disease.
Stay up-to-date on vaccinations: Get vaccinated for the flu, pneumonia, and other recommended vaccines to protect yourself and those you care for.

By following these steps, you can help minimize the spread of germs and infections and keep yourself and those you care for healthy.

Your Body

 

As a caregiver, keeping your body clean is essential to prevent the spread of germs and infections. Here are some tips to help you maintain good hygiene:

Daily shower or bath: Regular bathing helps remove dirt, sweat, and bacteria from your skin.
Brush your teeth twice a day: Brushing your teeth twice a day helps to remove plaque and prevent tooth decay and gum disease.
Wear clean clothes: Change your clothes daily and clean clothes free from stains and odors.
Wash your hands frequently: Wash your hands often with soap and warm water for at least 20 seconds, especially before and after caring for someone, after using the bathroom, and before and after handling food.
Trim your nails: Keep your nails trimmed and clean to prevent dirt and bacteria buildup.
Use deodorant or antiperspirant: Use deodorant or antiperspirant to control body odor.
Take care of your hair: Wash it regularly and make it clean and well-groomed.

By following these tips, you can help prevent the spread of germs and infections and maintain good hygiene as a caregiver.

Your Clothes

 

Wearing clean and dry clothes daily promotes a healthy lifestyle. When you look good, you feel good. A clean body means nothing if your clothes are ridden with bacteria and germs. Clean and fresh clothes are necessary for a healthy life. Dirty clothes can be full of dead skin and germs. Wearing dirty clothes can lead to skin infections, body order, and low self-esteem. So keep yourself in clean, laundered clothes daily. Also, make handwashing a priority. As a caregiver, keeping your clothes clean is essential to prevent the spread of germs and infection.

Here are some tips to help you maintain clean and hygienic clothing:

Wear clean clothes daily: Change your clothes daily and wear clean clothes free from stains and odors.
Use appropriate laundry products: Use those suitable for the fabric and effective against the type of virus or bacteria you are trying to eliminate. Follow the instructions on the product label for the best results.
Wash clothes in hot water: Wash clothes, especially those that are heavily soiled or have come into contact with bodily fluids, in hot water to kill germs and bacteria.
Dry clothes thoroughly using a dryer or clothesline to prevent mold and bacteria growth.
Avoid wearing work clothes outside of work: If you have work clothes that are heavily soiled, avoid wearing them outside of work to prevent the spread of germs.
Use disposable gloves and gowns when necessary: Use disposable gloves and gowns when providing care to someone sick or with an infectious disease.

As a caregiver, you can help maintain clean and hygienic clothing and prevent the spread of germs and infection.

Your Home

 

Two rooms, in particular, to care for the most are your bathroom and kitchen surfaces. The bathroom for sanitary reasons, and the kitchen simply because that is where you are preparing food for consumption. Use the bleach-based toilet, bathroom, and kitchen cleaners to clean with. Bleach kills bacteria! As a caregiver, it’s essential to keep the home clean to prevent the spread of germs and infection. Here are some tips to help you maintain a clean and healthy living environment:

Develop a cleaning routine: Create a cleaning schedule and stick to it. This will help you stay on top of cleaning tasks and prevent dirt and grime from building up.
Use appropriate cleaning products: Use products that are appropriate for the surface you are cleaning and effective against the specific type of virus or bacteria you are trying to eliminate. Follow the instructions on the product label for the best results.
Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces: Clean and disinfect surfaces such as doorknobs, light switches, and countertops daily, especially if someone in the household is sick.
Wash bedding regularly: Wash bedding, including sheets, pillowcases, and blankets, weekly in hot water to kill germs and bacteria.
Vacuum and mop regularly: Vacuum carpets, floors, and hard surfaces regularly to remove dirt and germs.
Keep the kitchen clean: Clean the kitchen regularly, especially after preparing food. For example, use separate cutting boards for raw meat and other foods, and wash dishes, utensils, and countertops with hot, soapy water.
Dispose of trash properly: Dispose of waste regularly and use a trash can with a lid to prevent the spread of germs and odors.

By following these tips, you can help maintain a clean and healthy living environment for yourself and those you care for.

Household Surfaces

 

Sure, this is part of your home, but it’s essential. I’m sure you clean your kitchen table, coffee table, and nightstands, but what about your computer keyboard, doorknobs, toilet flush handle, television remote, or microwave control panel? These are commonly touched things in your house. Some of them are connected more than others or touched by far more different people than others, but they all contain germs, some of which you’ve likely seldom or never cleaned before. Clean those surfaces with a bleach-based cleaner and spray them with Lysol. Lysol kills bacteria, too, and promotes infection control. Furthermore, handwashing is essential after touching these surfaces.

Overseeing this can cause stress because you can’t be in 2 places simultaneously: taking care of your business, your loved one, and your home. Look into hiring some help. Or maybe you want to spend more time with your loved one while taking a break from redundant business tasks like sending emails, returning calls, or organizing files. Let’s chat about how I can serve you so you can take care of your business and your loved ones.

Conclusion

 

as a caregiver, it’s essential to maintain good hygiene and keep your environment, body, and clothing clean to prevent the spread of germs and infection. By following the tips outlined above, such as washing your hands frequently, developing a cleaning routine, wearing clean clothes, and using appropriate cleaning and laundry products, you can help maintain a healthy living environment for yourself and those you care for. It’s important to remember that maintaining good hygiene is an ongoing process that requires consistent effort, but it’s a small price to pay to help ensure the health and well-being of yourself and those in your care.

The post How To Conquer Handwashing That Will Help You With Caregiving appeared first on The Ultimate Caregiving Expert.

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Nicole
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